1. uuuhshiny:

^ This ^

    uuuhshiny:

    ^ This ^

    Reblogged from: uuuhshiny
  2. uuuhshiny:

I’m a talented person ;)

    uuuhshiny:

    I’m a talented person ;)

    Reblogged from: uuuhshiny
  3. uuuhshiny:

    "I sat in casting as actor after actor came in. It was one of those evenings when you listen to the words of the script and wonder how they can sound this horrifyingly bad - dear god, am I truly that wretched a writer?

    Then Mr. Ackles walked in. The first scene involved his character sitting handcuffed as he tries to convince Max to let him go. It was tonally challenging, because although he’s cuffed, you have to have the impression he’s extremely dangerous - that in fact just listening to him is dangerous because he’ll screw with you psychologically.

    "Mind if I sit on the floor?" he asked calmly, in the voice of one who’s worked it all out ahead of time. He put his arms behind his back, did that scene, and wow. Young Hannibal Lecter, hello! Then he did the death scene, made my eyes tear up, walked calmly out, and we looked at each other. This was exactly the character I’d envisioned. It was clear to me that if anybody else got this role, I would have to commit ritual suicide.”

    - Doris Egan, writer, co-producer of Dark Angel (from this)

    Reblogged from: uuuhshiny
  4. Now it is such a bizarrely improbable coincidence that anything so mindboggingly useful [The Babel fish] could have evolved purely by chance that some thinkers have chosen to see it as the final and clinching proof of the nonexistence of God.
    The argument goes something like this: ‘I refuse to prove that I exist,’ says God, ‘for proof denies faith, and without faith I am nothing.’
    ‘But,’ says Man, ‘The Babel fish is a dead giveaway, isn’t it? It could not have evolved by chance. It proves you exist, and so therefore, by your own arguments, you don’t. QED.’
    ’Oh dear,’ says God, ‘I hadn’t thought of that,’ and promptly vanished in a puff of logic.
    The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams (via uuuhshiny)
    Reblogged from: uuuhshiny
  5. Reblogged from: uuuhshiny
  6. Language… has created the word “loneliness” to express the pain of being alone. And it has created the word “solitude” to express the glory of being alone.
    Paul Johannes Tillich (via thesearepeopleyouknow)
    Reblogged from: uuuhshiny
  7. uuuhshiny:

Harrison Ford

    uuuhshiny:

    Harrison Ford

    Reblogged from: uuuhshiny
  8. takingtheangeltoisengard:

    vivianandhersocalledlife:

    fleeingthemundane:

    image

    image

    image

    image

    That’s it. That’s tumblr.

    this is surprisingly accurate

    Reblogged from: lonewined
  9. allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

    allrightcallmefred:

    fredscience:

    The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

    I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

    Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

    The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

    Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

    I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

    Reblogged from: elizastar98
  10. raisedhunter:

littlehollyleaf:

Dean is not trapped in Purgatory with monsters.
Monsters are trapped in Purgatory with Dean. 

    raisedhunter:

    littlehollyleaf:

    Dean is not trapped in Purgatory with monsters.

    Monsters are trapped in Purgatory with Dean. 

    image

    Reblogged from: connolly-curleywurley
  11. martinsmind:

    jessepinkmanist:

    life hack: if you don’t want this to happen when clicking urls

    image

    hold in ctrl while clicking

    SPREAD THIS LIKE BUTTER ON A TOAST

    Reblogged from: connolly-curleywurley
  12. kamikaze95:

nowyoukno:

Remember IT IS NOT A WOMAN’S RESPONSIBILITY TO PREVENT RAPE. In the world we live in, however, women should be empowered with any tools in order to protect themselves. Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

:-))

    kamikaze95:

    nowyoukno:

    Remember IT IS NOT A WOMAN’S RESPONSIBILITY TO PREVENT RAPE. In the world we live in, however, women should be empowered with any tools in order to protect themselves. Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

    :-))

    Reblogged from: utherwasntallthatbad
  13. One of my external hard disks died… the ten seasons of Stargate SG-1 were there… this is not okay!!! I don’t remember what else was there, I DON’T CARE! I want my Stargate back!

  14. silentauroriamthereal:

    stovestalker:

    noshamejustlove:

    zorobro:

    shota-purinsu:

    zorobro:

    linzthenerd:

    theguilteaparty:

    crippledcuriosity:

    itsfondue:

    Isn’t it nice how people twist their religious scripture to suit their weds but when it’s used against them it’s suddenly not okay

    I talked to a monk about this quote once (we have mutual friends, and he came to a New Year’s Eve party at my shared art studio). He said this isn’t even talking about homosexuality. That the bible never actually says homosexuality is wrong. What that passage means is this:

    Women were treated as subservient and it that you shouldn’t treat other men as subservient, like they are beneath you. It is not talking about homosexuality. If it was, it would say it outright since the bible lists other things outright.

    I take the word of a monk who have studied the bible extensively more than a self proclaimed Christian.

    The above text, I would like to point out is from the point of view of this translation of the original Hebrew. I spoke with my cousin’s rabbi on the matter and his response was different, saying that it was a mistranslation. See, the true translation says that a man shall not lie with another in the bed of a woman, which is to say, the Hebrews had a shit ton of rules about when a man was or was not allowed in a woman’s bed and private quarters (including, if she didn’t want you there, you weren’t allowed there. Hebrew women were also allowed to divorce their husbands and the image of the ‘oppressive Hebrew people’ is an image that was propogated by Christianity which, historically speaking, doesn’t treat the Jewish people too well and liked to paint them as being rather barbaric and backwards and cultish with their traditions, which, another piece of fun info, their traditions were one of the main reasons why the Jewish people were less likely, in medieval times, to die of the plague. Because washing your hands and avoiding the dead and vermin and the like was a lot of help. Of course the Christians persecuted them for not dying but that’s another matter. I’m sidetracked). So the verse is literally saying ‘Don’t fuck in some lady’s bed because that’s just goddamn rude’

    Also, whenever a Christian brings the book of Leviticus up, you should feel free to point out that these are rules that were given to make the Hebrew people prepared for when the son of God came to earth. In Christianity, it’s believed the son of God was Jesus. So by following the rules set in Leviticus or pushing them as things we should follow, they’re saying that Jesus was not the son of God, and that Jesus did not, in fact, die for our sins. Jewish people believe, in their faith, that the son of God hasn’t yet been born, so many choose to follow these rules.

    Most people of course roll their eyes when I explain the translation of the verse (full breakdown found here) but it’s always fun to point out the nature of the rules in Leviticus and the implications of following them. 

    I’m a theology student and I am on the verge of crying because of how accurate this commentary is. Historical context is simultaneously the most interesting and most important part of interpreting any texts. 

    Most religious people seem to base their beliefs on things that are severely mistranslated. I wish they would do their research before using the bible for hate.

    I studied theology extensively and was going to become a theologist until I switched majors. The above commentary is 100% accurate and what I try to stress in a lot if conversations with Bible Thumpers.

    Jesus also affirms the homosexual relationship between the Roman Centurion and his “slave”. The particular Greek word used to refer to this special slave was “pais”. Greek language studies and contexts show that a “pais” was a male love slave. Regular slaves were called “dolos”. The Centurion makes this distinction clearly when he asks Jesus to heal his slave (pais), and then to prove his status he tells Jesus that his slaves (dolos) go when he tells them to. But this slave (pais) was special. He was the Centurion’s lover.

    Hearing this, Jesus was so amazed he says he had not found ANYONE ELSE who had such great faith. He then blesses the Centurion and heals his male lover.

    Matthew 8:5-13

    THIS IS WHAT THE BIBLE REALLY TEACHES ABOUT SAME SEX COUPLES.

    In short, the English adaptation is a mistranslated farce.

    ^^^^this

    reblogging for the comments ^^^^^^

    EXCUSE ME WHILE I REBLOG THIS FIFTY MILLION TIMES

    Reblogging because it just needs to be heard.

    Reblogged from: unfinished-symphonies
  15. Halt and Catch Fire Who's Who: Seriously

    othermelissawyatt:

    Okay, my previous post was tongue-in-cheek. But there are compelling reasons to get to know these characters, so with vague but not specific spoilers, a look at the primary cast of characters:

    image

    John Bosworth is introduced as a died-in-the-wool Texas good old boy, hidebound in the…

    Reblogged from: othermelissawyatt
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